Essays larb blog lit junkies 2

Literary Junkies

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Photo: Elizabeth Weinberg, part of “All Summer in a Day” series.

By Amy Spies

Readers, you may relate to my addiction.

It happened to me long ago.

I didn’t mean to get hooked.  I was just craving something to whisk me to another land, a better life, a fantastic world.  No one told me that all these lines, my blissful escape, could become a lifelong habit. Continue reading

LARB Channels

Coffee Table Talk with Sebastian Brock

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The Marginalia Review of Books, a LARB Channel, does great interviews over on their main sitethis one was originally posted last week, but deserves a listen. 

MRB editor-in-chief Timothy Michael Law talks to Sebastian Brock in Oxford. Formerly Reader in Syriac Studies in the Oriental Institute in Oxford and currently Professorial Fellow at Wolfson College, Brock is widely recognized as the world’s leading authority on Syriac language and history. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and in 2009 received the honor of the Leverhulme Medal and Prize. The Medal is awarded every three years for “a significant contribution to knowledge and understanding in a field within the humanities and social sciences.” Continue reading


The China Blog D8I_5215

Made in Bulgaria

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Photo: A Made-in-Bulgaria Chinese pickup truck on display near the Monument to the Soviet Army in Sofia, Bulgaria.

By Tong Lam

The future is all around us, hidden in physical signifiers, but we often lack the key to understanding the significations. The square around the Monument to the Soviet Army in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, is  one place where the future, along with the past, is teasing us, demanding our attention and interpretation even as we are not quite sure how to make sense of what we see. Located in the city center, the monument was built in 1954 to commemorate the Soviet liberation of Nazi-allied Bulgaria. In recent years, as Bulgarian politicians debate the future of the monument, local graffiti artists have repeatedly vandalized the space, bringing their own voices into the argument. Some graffiti artists have used paint to transform the bronze statues of Red Amy soldiers into comic book characters (e.g. Superman) and icons related to global brands (e.g. Ronald McDonald). Most recently, some adorned one of the statues with the Ukrainian national colors – blue and yellow – to express their disagreement with Russian actions in that former part of the Soviet Union.   Continue reading


LARB Channels larb blog the wire

On Watching the Wire Again

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Originally published on LARB Channel Avidly, Claire Jarvis recounts her experience of watching The Wire again. 

By Claire Jarvis

It’s deep in July, and there’s nothing on television; the season of rewatching is upon us. My partner and I have decided on The Wire. The first two times I watched The Wire, I was living in the Baltimore it claimed to represent. I had moved to the city for graduate school and the twin towers had fallen on the first full week of classes. I watched the news coverage of that event on my 13” television (with combination VCR) and hoped to God my lone pre-a-week-ago friend would come over that evening so I wouldn’t be alone. Part of the power in The Wire comes from its representation of urban destruction to a wider world that had just come into consciousness that it, too, could possibly be destroyed. Baltimore, that gorgeous nineteenth century city, with row after row of working peoples’ houses, housing that had been filled in the booming forties and fifties, had been steadily shrinking for almost a half century when the towers fell. Continue reading


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Bread and Circus: A Round-up of our Best World Cup Pieces

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Photo: Brazil, May 10, 2014

By Leon Dische Becker

If you’ve been following our World Cup symposium, Brazil’s lackluster performance will not have come as a surprise to you. We kicked off our coverage with a pertinent interview about the legendary rise and recent fall of Brazilian football.

Continue reading


LARB Channels larb blog we out here

We Out Here

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Photo: SRO fire escape. SoMa, SF, 2010. 

Today’s post is a photo essay on San Francisco by Rian Dundon, originally published by LARB Channel Boom.

By Rian Dundon

Editor’s note: We asked photographer Rian Dundon to put a face on the displacement that is roiling San Francisco. His photo essay focuses on the city, but also on surrounding areas like Oakland, San Jose, and even Santa Cruz because, as he noted: these issues spill out. “Especially if you’re talking about inequality, geographically, you have to look at if people are being kicked out of San Francisco, where are they ending up?” He told us that he approached the assignment not as a journalist but from “a more ambiguous space in photography—to find the power of what can be suggested more than literally described.” Continue reading


LARB Quarterly Journal larb blog hitler

Hitler, Continued

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Laurie Winer, Senior Fiction editor, blogs about a LARB exclusive online today: Ron Rosenbaum’s new Afterword to an updated edition of his brilliant 1998 opus, Explaining Hitler.  

By Laurie Winer

Of the billions of words written about the Holocaust, some of them brilliant and harrowing, others of them idiotic and harrowing, nothing reaches (or indeed tries to reach) the exuberance of Mel Brooks’s 1968 film The Producers, a comedy cri de coeur that says, essentially, this: We’re alive and you’re dead, and we’re laughing at you. Continue reading


The China Blog larb china blog bad articles

Bad China Articles: Hall of Infamy

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This week’s China Blog post was originally published on The Anthill, a “writers colony” focused on writings about China, edited by Alec Ash

By Alec Ash

The Anthill occasionally loans its soul to the devil and does listicles. So far we’ve done China books and China blogs. Now we turn our eye to that richest of terrains – bad articles about China – in the form of a top ten hall of infamy. Continue reading


LARB Channels larb blog morbid

I See Dead People

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This piece was originally published today, July 8, by LARB Channel Avidly

By Alizah Salario

At The Morbid Anatomy Museum in Brooklyn, the dead fill every nook and cranny. “Art of Mourning,” the current exhibit, features celluloid medallions and Victorian-era memorial photographs depicting the waxy, masklike faces of the dead. In “Sleeping Beauty” photos, deceased little girls and boys are cradled in open caskets or propped up in rocking chairs, as still and flawless as porcelain dolls. There are intricate wreaths woven from the hair of the dead in commemoration. What if modern mourners were to knot friendship bracelets from dear dead Bubbe’s blue-grey locks, or use a selfie with her on her deathbed as their Smartphone wallpaper? Just imagine. At best they’d be stigmatized as morbid; more likely perverse or pathological. Death, as we know it today, often happens behind closed doors, hooked to machines, in solitude and silence. Even if there was time to grab a lock of hair or snap a photo, the public display of keepsakes of the dead are today usually considered distasteful or maudlin. Continue reading


LARB Channels

Marginalia Radio Interviews Randall Balmer on Jimmy Carter

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This interview is from LARB Channel Marginalia, and is number 13 in their ongoing radio series. 

Art Remillard talks with Randall Balmer about his new book, Redeemer: The Life of Jimmy Carter. Balmer is the Mandel Family Professor in the Arts and Sciences at Dartmouth College, and author of more than a dozen books, including Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory: A Journey into the Evangelical Subculture in America