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January Horoscopes

By Ichrak Dahou

The Sun travels through Capricorn for much of this month, and the Sun’s light will bring the earthly energy of Capricorn into our consciousness. Many planets are in Pisces for much of the month, which means psychic fields are more porous than usual. Take care to keep both your physical and emotional spaces energetically clear. Be deliberate about creating and entertaining positive thoughts, and about seeking solutions that are aligned with your personal values. Focus on things that are immediately applicable in your world, rather than giving in to feelings of helplessness about what is happening in the world at large. Continue reading

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On Payment

By Melissa Chadburn

Before I die… this is the writing prompt I used to give the first day of class. And I wish I remember what the tall young blonde had written. Carrie Melvin, whose favorite novel was The Lover by Marguerite Duras. She brought a copy to class and talked about it sheepishly. Like this was revealing something very secret about her. The way we do when we talk about books. I wish I was paying special attention to what she said. Because two weeks later, in July of 2015, she was murdered. Continue reading

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Faith in 2017

By Michelle Chihara

2016 began with David Bowie losing his battle with cancer. Prince died in the spring. George Michael died on Christmas. Last Christmas. Carrie Fisher died two days later, on my birthday, as it happens. Her mother Debbie Reynolds’ heart broke planning her daughter’s funeral. She died the next day. I imagine exquisite drag queens and other unsung heroes greeting them all with cocktails in the heavens, saying, I know you still had work to do down there but we just couldn’t wait for you any longer. It’s so grim these days, watching them destroy themselves. Continue reading

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Dumplings, Dictators, and Daoists — Six Book Recommendations

By Jeffrey Wasserstrom

I wrote the first draft of this post on the final day of 2016, and then revised it on the first day of 2017, so it is fitting that it will be divided between backward looking and forward looking halves.  In the opening half, I will provide micro-reviews of two worthy but dissimilar 2016 books.  They explore, respectively the cuisine of the Jiangnan Region of China that includes the cities of Shanghai, Suzhou, and Hangzhou, and the puzzle of how China’s Communist Party keeps outliving predictions of its imminent demise.  I thought at various points that I would work extended discussions of these 2016 publications into piece I was writing, but that never happened.  I am glad to at least be able to give them short shout outs here.  Continue reading

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Getting Schooled: Bluto vs. Tracy Flick

By Liesl Schillinger

On Friday, January 6th, eight weeks after our disastrous national election, Congress will meet for the official tally of electoral votes, and Vice President Biden will announce Donald Trump as our President-elect. At this moment, unthinkable a year ago, it’s consoling, if in a bleak and bootless way, to reflect that Hillary Clinton, the most qualified and experienced candidate for the Presidency this country has ever seen, actually did win the race. That is; she won the popular vote by some 2.9 million votes, perhaps more.
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Only Emote

By Zack Hatfield

A little over a year ago, when entrepreneur and reality television tycoon Kim Kardashian debuted the first wildly popular line of celebrity emojis named Kimoji — an app that packages personalized emoticons and digital stickers for smartphones — a rumor propagated by online entertainment sites and the star herself claimed that Kardashian had broken Apple’s app store. The rumor proved false, but the publicity helped. Even more, people liked the Kimojis, which included risqué curves, Yeezy sneakers, a corset, a cannabis leaf, a car with suicide doors, and a now-viral image of Kardashian’s face with a pixelated tear placed below a kohl-dipped eyelash. Continue reading

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The Explorer’s History of Korean Fiction in Translation: Literature as Japanese Colonialism Fell

By Charles Montgomery

The LARB Korea Blog is currently featuring selections from The Explorer’s History of Korean Fiction in Translation, Charles Montgomery’s book-in-progress that attempts to provide a concise history, and understanding, of Korean literature as represented in translation. You can find links to previous selections at the end of the post. Continue reading

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Senator Feinstein and Judge Koh

By Carl Tobias

On December 10, the Senate recessed without conducting a final vote on United States District Judge Lucy Haeran Koh. This means that her February Ninth Circuit nomination will expire when the 115th Congress assembles on January 3. The upper chamber failed to provide Judge Koh’s ballot, even though she is an experienced, mainstream jurist, who enjoys the powerful support of California Democratic Senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer, won bipartisan Senate Judiciary Committee approval in September and has languished on the floor ever since. Continue reading