Koreans in Strange Lands: The History- and Culture-Saturated Fiction of Jo Jung-Rae

By Charles Montgomery

One month ago, in this space, I discussed Jo Jung-Rae’s How in Heaven’s Name, a historical novel of a Korean citizen buffeted from army to army, and country to country, by war. (“Jo Jung-Rae” is the author’s preferred Romanization of his own name, but publishers have used others.) This week, following up on Jo as an author, I will discuss his other translated works, two novels and a novella: The Land of the Banished, Playing with Fire, and The Human Jungle. Continue reading

Standing with Standing Rock: The Story Beneath the Stories

By Brendan Clarke

The following article is the first in a five-part series about the movement at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation. The mobilization, of people and resources, which was spurred on by the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, began an unprecedented convergence of hundreds of Indigenous Tribes, and thousands upon thousands of people. The series, which was originally written as a single piece, offers the reflections of Brendan Clarke, who traveled to Standing Rock from November 19th through December 9th to join in the protection of water, sacred sites, and Indigenous sovereignty. As part of this journey, which was supported by and taken on behalf of many members of his community, Brendan served in many different roles at the camps, ranging from direct action to cleaning dishes and constructing insulated floors. He, along with the small group he traveled with, also created a long-term response fund, which they are currently stewarding. These stories are part of his give-away, his lessons learned, and his gratitude, for his time on the ground. Continue reading

March Horoscopes

By Ichrak Dahou

This month begins with a vibrant and electric energy that could bring about a quick development, an avalanche of events, or an unexpected stroke of luck that offers a chance to break free. This is a free-wheeling energy that does ask for conscious engagement rather than flow with previous or existing status quo. It is a chance to create something new, and to give the consciousness upgrade that is occurring an outlet through which to express itself!  Continue reading

The Most Beautiful Minute in the History of Cinema

By Steve Light

for Joe Bucholt,
as good, as kind, as lovely
a person as you could ever hope to know,
yes, the best, the most beautiful kind of person

In his book, Profanations, the Italian philosopher Giorgio Agamben includes a little essay, barely a page and a half long, “The Six Most Beautiful Minutes in the History of Cinema.” Agamben speaks of a sequence in a never-completed film of Orson Welles that sought to depict what further adventures Don Quixote and Sancho Panza might encounter if they were to find themselves in the 20th Century. Welles, after a dispute with the studio executives concerning the editing of his film Touch of Evil, simply took off for Mexico, where he began shooting his Quixote film. Continue reading

The Upside Down World: Shadows of Cold War Ghosts in Stranger Things

By Ting Guo

With Stranger Things, Netflix produced an original science fiction drama that went viral. But for me, it is also offered up a political drama that illuminated elements of our persistently divided world — and how we might save ourselves from it. Here, in what is admittedly more a series of fragmented reflections than a full account of the series and all of the ways it can be linked to the Cold War and its aftermath, are my thoughts, while watching it in Indiana, reflecting on the present moment and on how different my 1980s was from that shown in the movie and that remembered by American viewers of the same show. Continue reading

An Alphabet for Vegans: Laura Wright on The First Mess Cookbook

By Chloe Chappe

Laura Wright is the creator of the Saveur Magazine award-winning blog The First Mess. She hails from southern Ontario, Canada, where she still lives and cooks, in her creative and striking style. Laura crafts mostly vegan and gluten free recipes, packing in as much flavor, warmth, and nourishment as she can. The First Mess Cookbook, out March 7th, features many of her unique, innovative recipes, including  Creamy Quinoa and White Bean Risotto with Crispy Brassica Florets, as well as a Earl Grey Tiramisu. We discussed the stress of working on a cookbook, the community in the wellness cooking blog world, and her lineup of female culinary idols.

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Will Korea’s Most Famous Buddhist Monk and His Tweets of Zen Wisdom Play in America?

By Colin Marshall

“Penguin’s English translation of The Things You Can See Only When You Slow Down comes out in America on February 7th,” tweeted South Korea’s most famous monk, in Korean, at the beginning of this year. “At about the same time, it’s scheduled to come out in fifteen other Western countries like England, Spain, Brazil, Russia, Sweden as well. Please understand my frequent tweeting in English.” Up to that point, communicating with his readers in only his and presumably their native language, Haemin Sunim (sunim, or 스님, being the honorific title for a Buddhist monk) amassed a crowd of followers now numbering 1.24 million. That would qualify him as a Twitter celebrity by any standard, but in beginning to tweet in English, Haemin Sunim effectively announced an attempt to take it the next level. Continue reading

What is America Anyway?: An Interview With Eula Biss

By Cypress Marrs

In 1979, Joan Didion proclaimed, “we tell ourselves stories in order to live.” Eula Biss brings this certainty back from the brink of truism by asking: what are these stories? Where do they come from? And what do they mean for the way we live? Dissecting the myths that determine the way news is covered and the world is conceived, Biss employs the personal, the philosophical, the linguistic, and the historical to reframe moral and political dilemmas. Continue reading

-- LW --