Category Archives: LARB Main Site

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LARB’s Top 25 Most Read Articles of 2014

1. Young Adult Cancer Story by Briallen Hopper, July 16th, 2014

Author John Green called it his “favorite essay on The Fault in Our Stars yet.”

2. We Need To Talk About Tyrion: How HBO Failed George R. R. Martin’s Iconic Character by Ilana Teitelbaum, November 21st, 2014

“What is most remarkable about this moment in the TV series is that the show gets it wrong.”

3. Hitler, Continued: Afterword from the Updated Edition of “Explaining Hitler: The Search for the Origins of His Evil” by Ron Rosenbaum, July 10th, 2014

Ron Rosenbaum’s characteristically brilliant response to all the important updates that have occurred in Hitler studies in the past 15 years.

  1. Sarah Mesle on Texts from Jane Eyre by Sarah Mesle, November 6th, 2014

Texts from Jane Eyre is not only a major work of bathroom humor reading, but also a significant contribution to feminist literary criticism.

5. The Posthuman Scar-Jo by Sophia Nguyen, September 12th, 2014

Scarlett Johansson in Her (Spike Jonze, 2013), Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer, 2013), and Lucy (Luc Besson, 2014). Continue reading

in Port au Prince, Haiti, Friday, February 26, 2010.

Haiti: Then and Now

The following are selections from a photo essay by Allison Shelley titled “Haiti: Then and Now,” documenting Shelley’s time both covering Haiti on location in 2010, and then just recently, 2015 during her trip back there. The photo gallery includes 32 photographs presented in pairs: one from 2010, another from 2015, typically of the same scene or subject. The full photo essay, along with an essay by Allyn Gaestel titled “Still Fissured: Haiti’s Health System, Five Years After the Earthquake,” is located on our main site. 

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A water tank in a tent camp behind the Notre Dame de l’Assomption Catholic church sports a message from its inhabitants, in Port au Prince, Haiti, Friday, February 26, 2010. ©Allison Shelley

 

Five years after the quake, a tent camp behind the Notre Dame de l’Assomption Catholic church still houses the displaced, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, January 4, 2015. ©Allison Shelley Continue reading

Keep us flying

Letter from Editor-in-Chief Tom Lutz

Dear LARB supporter,

I know you are getting a lot of emails like this, as am I, as many nonprofits rush to meet their goals.

We are very close to securing all the funds for this, our most ambitious matching grant fund drive to date. All we need to do is match what we raised in the last two days of our drive last year – and so if you gave last year and haven’t done so yet this year, we urge you to chip in what you can; if you’ve been thinking about becoming a member, or re-enrolling at a higher level, do it today or tomorrow and we get two bucks for every one of yours.

During our fund drive campaign, you’ve heard from Margaret Atwood about why she supports LARB. You’ve heard from James Ellroy, Reza Aslan, Janet Fitch, Jamie Wolf, Albert Litewka, the LARB staff themselves, and so many more.  Now it’s time for us to hear from you.

Click here to donate. Whether it’s $25, $50, $150, $200, or more, make a statement that you support Los Angeles Review of Books‘s mission to keep critical thinking alive and well in this increasingly atomized digital age.

This is your Review – we wouldn’t be here without your support, and we won’t continue to be here without it. To everyone who has given, thank you so much for bringing us this close. I’m proud of what we accomplished this year, and we hope, with your help, that next year will be even better.

Thank you so much,

Tom Lutz

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The LARB End-of-Year Editor Interviews: Michelle Huneven

Editor’s Note: This is the ninth interview of several we’ll be publishing this month, all with our section editors. Like the rest of the LARB ecosystem, their work depends on the generous support of everyday readers who keep LARB going;  we hope you’ll consider giving this month for our winter fund drive. Here we present Michelle Huneven, a Senior Fiction Editor. 

Give us some background – how did you end up working at LARB? What do you do for LARB? What do you do when you’re not working for LARB?

I had been eyeing LARB since its inception, and finally asked if I might step into the drink. I am a Senior Fiction Editor, which means that I assign essays about fiction, reviews of fiction and interviews with fiction writers, which I then edit and, eventually, shepherd into production.When I am not editing and shepherding, I am trying to write fiction. I also teach creative writing at UCLA.  Continue reading

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Letter from the Chairman of the Board

After graduate school, I moved from Berkeley to New York to pursue a career as a poet and novelist. I got my first job at McGraw-Hill Book Company, and wrote at night. A few years later I had occasion to travel on business to Los Angeles. Needing to do some research, I obtained a temporary library card and visited a local branch of the public library. After gathering the materials I needed, I went to the checkout desk, where an elderly librarian examined my card.

“Albert Litewka,” she said looking up at me. “Are you the Albert Litewka who many years ago attended Manchester Avenue grammar school?”

“Yes,” I responded. “Why do you ask?”

I had attended Manchester Avenue, deep in South Central (now called South) Los Angeles, after my Holocaust refugee family moved from New York to Los Angeles due to my mother’s poor health.

“My name is Miss Smith,” the woman said. “I was the librarian on the book mobile that came to your school every two weeks. The limit on the number of books a person could check out from the public library system was 14 books. Every two weeks a little boy would climb up into the book mobile and check out 14 books. He took historical novels, biographies, histories, science and sports books, and mysteries. He would stagger off the book mobile behind a stack of books as tall as his head. I would go back to the librarian’s headquarters and tell them about that boy. I used to say, ‘I wonder what that boy does with those books.’ And I always hoped that someday I would find out what happened to that boy.”

Well, I was that boy, and today it is my privilege to serve as Chairman of the Los Angeles Review of Books. Along the way, I have been President of Macmillan Publishing Company, among other companies, and enjoyed considerable business success. I didn’t wind up winning the Nobel Prize for literature, which was my first and most deeply felt ambition, but being able to help guide and build LARB has been the next best thing. All of us associated with it have poured ourselves into making LARB what Richard Brody in The New Yorker called, “One of the instant jewels of the Internet,” and playwright Jon Robin Baitz called, “The best literary magazine in the country.”

For LARB to have come so far in less than three years would not have been possible without the pooling of skills and energies from our many contributors, editors, volunteers, contractors, and staff. Nor would it have been possible without the generous support of our readers. As a nonprofit public benefit corporation, LARB is reader supported. Everything we are doing is for you, and can only be done with your support.

Please help us continue our good work by donating as generously as you can to our end-of-year matching grant fund drive. The Goldhirsh Foundation and an anonymous donor have put up $75,000 to match your donations.

LARB is independent, provocative, timely, and free-of-charge. We publish digitally, in print, in podcasts, on the radio, and in short films the best thinking and writing about books and culture today. We are read in all 50 states and some 150 countries worldwide. With your help and support, we will continue to fulfill LARB‘s mission, always with you, our reader, in mind.

With warm best wishes for an enjoyable holiday season and a healthy, productive New Year.

Sincerely,

Albert Litewka

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The LARB End-of-Year Editor Interviews: Cecil Castellucci

Editor’s Note: This is the eighth interview of several we’ll be publishing this month, all with our section editors. Like the rest of the LARB ecosystem, their work depends on the generous support of everyday readers who keep LARB going;  we hope you’ll consider giving this month for our winter fund drive. Here we present Cecil Castellucci, Young Adult Fiction Editor. Check out today’s YA special coverage on the legacy of Little Red Riding Hood stories and how they’ve evolved: Aisha Anwar’s “In the Shadow of the Wolf,” and Claire Jimenez’s “Eight Ways Red.”

Give us some background – how did you end up working at LARB? What do you do for LARB? What do you do when you’re not working for LARB?

When Tom Lutz launched the LA Review of Books, he wanted to make sure that all the literary nooks were covered.  I had met him at various functions in Los Angeles and since I am so involved with the YA world in Los Angeles he turned to me. I edit the YA and Children’s section.  This means mostly I commission or accept pitches for thought pieces and essay’s on Young People’s Literature.  I am a full time Young Adult author.   Continue reading

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Support LARB Today and You Could Receive Tickets to the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra

To help us reach our $75,000 matching grant fund drive goal, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra has generously offered a gift certificate good for two tickets to their 2014-15 Orchestral Series concert at the Alex Theatre in Glendale or UCLA’s Royce Hall.

Anyone who gives $250 or more from now until December 31 at 11:59 PM will enter a pool to be the lucky recipient of the tickets!

We’re more than halfway through our fund drive. The good news is that hundreds of everyday readers have donated to help us earn a $75,000 matching grant, and we’ve almost reached our goal. But we’re not there yet.

Please consider donating to support independent publishing today!

 

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Letter From Editor-in-Chief Tom Lutz

All of us at the Los Angeles Review of Books felt great sadness last week at the news that The New Republic was falling apart. TNR had been losing $3 million a year, but had, people thought, been rescued by an internet billionaire. There isn’t a serious magazine editor out there who wouldn’t like an internet billionaire to drop like manna out of the sky — running an independent magazine in the age of digital media isn’t easy: the very internet that produced such billionaires has destroyed the traditional revenue model for magazines like ours.

That magazines like The New Republic, and Harpers, and LARB lose money is no secret. The Paris Review has an endowment and is funded in part by donations. Harper’s gets funded — to the tune of some $4.5 million a year — by a foundation. Literary magazines already needed non-commercial funding before the digital revolution hit, but things are more dire now that analog dollars have shrunk to digital dimes.

LARB now produces a greater quantity of serious work now than any of these venerable outlets, and we have managed to do it on a tiny fraction of their budgets. We’ve achieved this remarkable feat because of the volunteer labor of many, and because people have opened their wallets and opened their homes to hold fundraisers for us, written reviews and essays for nothing or next to nothing, done pro bono legal and technical work for us, and otherwise chipped in to build this remarkable home for cultural exchange. Continue reading

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The LARB End-of-Year Editor Interviews: Jerry Gorin

Editor’s Note: This is the seventh interview of several we’ll be publishing this month, all with our section editors. They’re an eclectic bunch, each with their own projects and day jobs. Like the rest of the LARB ecosystem, they rely on the donations of our readership, and we hope you’ll consider giving this month. This one is with Jerry Gorin, the Director of LARB AV.

Give us some background – how did you end up working at LARB? What do you do for LARB? What do you do when you’re not working for LARB?

I was working as a producer and reporter at KPCC radio a few years ago and looking for more avenues to do multimedia stuff. I met the executive editor Jonathan Hahn through one of LARB‘s longtime copyeditors, Antal Neville, and he told me LARB was looking for help to ramp up their AV program. I’ve been there ever since and have helped shape the section into what it is today, which is a home for in-depth author interviews, profiles, and literary and arts based documentaries. Continue reading

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The LARB End-of-Year Editor Interviews: Sarah Mesle

Editor’s Note: This is the sixth interview of several we’ll be publishing this month, all with our section editors. They’re an eclectic bunch, each with their own projects and day jobs. Like the rest of the LARB ecosystem, they rely on the donations of our readership, and we hope you’ll consider giving this month. This one is with Sarah Mesle, our Senior Humanities Editor. 

Give us some background – how did you end up working at LARB? What do you do for LARB? What do you do when you’re not working for LARB?

I snuck into LARB through the Young Adult door.  In the fall of 2012 I pitched Cecil Castellucci, LARB’s YA editor, an essay about boyhood in young adult books.  I remember agonizing over the pitch — I was SO anxious — and being very relieved by Cecil’s enthusiastic and immediate welcome. So I wrote a few YA things, and through that met Evan Kindley, LARB’s previous humanities editor.  I started helping him out with editing a few academic book reviews, and then stepped into his position when he decided to move on. Continue reading