Category Archives: Interviews

Washington and Moscow in the Time of Trump: An Interview with Nina Khrushcheva

By Olivia Humphrey (PhD candidate at UCI) for the Provocations series, in conjunction with UCI’s “The Future of Truth” conference

Given the recent attention on U.S.-Russia relations and comparisons, the team responsible for the “Future of Truth” workshop at UC Irvine decided to turn to Nina Khrushcheva, a participant in last year’s “What Cannot Be Said” forum for insight. Nina Khrushcheva is a professor of International Affairs at the New School, a senior fellow of World Policy Institute, and contributing editor to Project Syndicate: Association of Newspapers Around the WorldContinue reading

The Creative Independent on the Art of the Interview

By Edith Young

The Creative Independent launched in October of 2016, publishing its first original interview with poet Eileen Myles on day one, followed by artist Björk on day two. Out of the gate running, TCI stated its goal: to become a “resource of emotional and practical guidance for creative people.” The publication, embracing the archival nature of the internet, aspires to assemble an oral history of contemporary creative processes and practices. A spring chicken in the world of digital publishing platforms, TCI is technically a Kickstarter project, and an extension of their mission to support and champion the arts, though the site seems to operate as its own ecosystem within the crowdfunding corporation. Continue reading

The Making of a First Novel: An Interview with Lijia Zhang

By Mengfei Chen

In 2008, Lijia Zhang published a memoir that dealt with her childhood, her experiences working in a missile factory, and her participation in marches that took place in Nanjing in the spring of 1989, while protesters in Beijing were occupying Tiananmen Square.  Titled “Socialism is Great!”: A Worker’s Memoir of the New China, it garnered strong reviews and earned the author invitations to speak at literary festivals and other events around the world.  Since then, Zhang has regularly published commentaries on cultural and political events.  Then, earlier this month, she published Lotus: A Novel, her first extended work of fiction.  Mengfei Chen, co-editor of this blog, recently caught up with Zhang by email to ask her questions relating to her new novel. Continue reading

Dreaming of Uncommon Languages: An Interview with Poet Jordi Alonso and Illustrator Phoebe Carter

By Lauren Kessler

I met Jordi Alonso at a writers’ conference in New York in the summer of 2013. At the time, he was working on a series of erotic poems inspired by the Greek poet Sappho that would become his first book, Honeyvoiced, published by XOXOX Press. Jordi studied literary translation and poetry at Kenyon College, where he graduated with an AB in English with an emphasis in Creative Writing, in the spring of 2014. He went on to receive his MFA from SUNY Stony Brook, where he was the Turner Fellow in Poetry, and today he is a PhD candidate and a Gus T. Ridgel Fellow at the University of Missouri. Continue reading

Feminism in China and the Wandering Life: An Interview with Maura Elizabeth Cunningham

By Jeffrey Wasserstrom

It has now been about half a year since Maura Cunningham started a new position with the Association for Asian Studies and switched from being a co-editor of to an occasional contributor to this blog, so this seemed a good time to check in with her about her new job.  It is also an apt moment to check in with her about her activities as a writer, since she has an article in the latest issue of the World Policy Journal. Continue reading

Our Monsters Are Like Us: An Interview with Abdellah Taïa

By Sam Metz

Abdellah Taïa was born in a public library and grew up in Salé, the poorer, twin city that sits across the Bou Regreg River from Rabat. Though he now resides in France and hasn’t lived in Morocco for almost 20 years, it still figures largely in his fiction, which is often about “that specific time at the beginning of adolescence when […] you see what they want you to be, and how you are going to escape it.” Continue reading

From Diamond Village to Wukan: An Interview with the China Media Project’s David Bandurski

By Jeffrey Wasserstrom

In last week’s post, three regular contributors to the China Blog gave suggestions for books dealing with Chinese themes that would make good holiday gifts.  Next week’s post will take the form of a sequel, offering recommendations for last minute present shopping.  So, it seems fitting that this post, which falls between, is an interview with the author of a very appealing book on China that would also be good to give to someone on your to-buy-for list. Published in other markets by Penguin last year but only recently available in the U.S., it is titled Dragons in Diamond Village: And Other Tales from the Back Alleys of Urbanising China, and it is by the versatile David Bandurski, an independent journalist, documentary filmmaker, and now book author as well. Bandurski joins me here to discuss recent developments in rural-urban unrest and the state of the Chinese media. Continue reading