Category Archives: Events

Inside the Rhode Island School of Design’s New York Fashion Week Show

 

Article and photos by Edith Young

Phelan, Mansur Gavriel, Maryam Nassir Zadeh, Nicole Miller, Eckhaus Latta: Glancing at the New York Fashion Week calendar, it’s not immediately apparent that so many designers on the roster spent years toiling away in studios at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD) before launching their eponymous labels. One might speculate that there will be more famous names in fashion to emerge from RISD; its history speaks for itself. On the second to last day of this season’s New York Fashion Week, ten newly-minted RISD apparel graduates presented the school’s first ever Fashion Week show. They convened backstage at Skylight Clarkson, one of the premiere event spaces for shows like Vera Wang, Cynthia Rowley, Hood by Air, and Band of Outsiders. Helping models shimmy into garments, strap into Tevas, and lace up cleats, the recent alums prepared to reveal a year’s worth of work to a new audience. While the designers had already debuted their Apparel Design theses in May on a makeshift runway in RISD’s Fleet Library, September 14th’s New York presentation felt like a coming out ball.

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Difficult Situations: Zoe Leonard’s In the Wake

By Zack Hatfield

Photographs of photographs constitute a peculiarly self-conscious genre. These images often emit a jejune urgency, an automatic feeling that the photographs they depict must be preserved. Given the rapid transformation of the photographic medium, it’s noteworthy that a physical photograph no longer qualifies as a preservation in and of itself — there must be a digital replication of the object. Photos are taken so that information can be shared (one thinks now of the reliable screenshot) — or so that information can be destroyed, the simulated a proxy for the actual. Sometimes, a photograph of a photograph implies historical and psychic gulfs between both beholders. As Zoe Leonard’s latest exhibit shows, these photographs can bear witnesses to — and perform in — the mysterious drama that is memory. Continue reading

A Convergence of Rad Women at Skylight Books

By Tori Gesualdo

This moment in human history has the word gender turning over and over in its mouth, the sandstone of the modern tongue stripping away the callouses on the word “woman.” On October 3rd at Skylight Books, author Kate Schatz and illustrator Miriam Klein Stahl heralded the word “woman” in the presentation of their new book Rad Women Worldwide. The book is a celebration of amazing women throughout human history, like activist Malala Yousafzai, novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and British punk rocker Poly Styrene. It is sequel to the duo’s first work, Rad Women of America, and a very considerate and artful archive of global femininity. The widened scope of subject matter was approached with great attention to diversity; of skill, of global recognition, of race, and of creed. By acknowledging each rad woman’s unique tribulations on her way to triumph, they have created not only an artifact of female excellence, but of female strength and tenacity in the face of patriarchy, racial oppression, and war. Continue reading

My First Afropunk Festival

By Imogen Teasley-Vlautin

At most punk shows, or any alternative music show, there are only a few other black people amidst a sea of white faces. But during one extraordinary weekend each year at Commodore Berry Park in Brooklyn, the Afropunk Festival brings all of these few black people from scenes all over to this one place. It is the only weekend where we get to see the evidence that, yes, all different kinds of beautiful black people exist, and here they celebrate their art and culture with love. It is a celebration of the freedom to be you — while also being black — and that is revolutionary. Continue reading

The 2015 Herb Alpert Award in the Arts

Herb Alpert said of the 2015 HAAIA winners, “It’s exciting to be able to support these five unique artists who are always on the hunt for something they don’t yet know, something real that touches us in a deep place. Whether they are writing a concerto, making a film, an installation, a ruckus or a dance, they always look for something special and original to say. These are artists with the passion, talent and the restlessness that never makes them stop. They HAVE TO make art not just for themselves… but for all of US.”

The awards recognize past performance and future promise to artists working in Dance, Film/Video, Music, Theatre and Visual Arts; an outstanding candidate in each genre receives a prize of $75,000. Continue reading

OBITUARY NOTICE FOR 10265 Cheviot Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90064

By Noel Anenberg

LOS ANGELES, 10265 CHEVIOT DRIVE – HOME TO RAY BRADBURY

CONSTRUCTED 1937 – DEMOLISHED 2015

10265 Cheviot Drive, Los Angeles, home of fifty years to National Book Foundation medal winner Ray Bradbury, his wife Maggie of fifty-four years, and their four daughters. Basement office to Bradbury, author of Fahrenheit 451, The Illustrated Man, The Martian Chronicles, and myriad other works. Demolished by Pritzker Prize winning architect, Thomas Mayne. Artifacts from Bradbury’s basement office may be permanently viewed at The Center for Ray Bradbury Studies, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. Survived by the homes of Carl Sandburg, Mark Twain, Robert Frost, Louisa May Alcott, Emily Dickerson, Flannery O’Connor, William Faulkner, and Frederick O’Douglass and others.

In lieu of flowers please send contributions to The Los Angeles Review of Books.

Piety and Perversity: The Palms of Los Angeles

Image by Stefano Galli

Victoria Dailey, the author of “Piety and Perversity: The Palms of Los Angeles,” which was part of our recent collaboration with Flaunt Magazine, is giving a talk (the talk has the same title as the piece) today at UCLA.  Information on the talk is below.

Piety and Perversity: The Palms of Los Angeles

Thursday, January 15, 2015
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm, William Andrews Clark Library – Facility

Free and open to the public, but advance registration is requested. Please be aware that space at the Clark is limited and that registration closes when capacity is reached. Confirmation will be sent via email.

This illustrated lecture seeks to analyze, document, and interpret the history of palm trees in Los Angeles and how they came to dominate not only the landscape but also the cultural mythos. Although the palm tree is not native to the Los Angeles area, it has become accepted as a regional icon. More recognized than native sycamores, oaks, or willows, palms have become a visual synonym for Los Angeles. An explanation of this phenomenon and a suggestion about a new horticultural future for the city comprise the talk.    Continue reading

Clockshop Cheap Talk Conversation Series

Editor’s Note: Below is information about an upcoming conversation series run by Clockshop. 

Cheap Talk is a conversation series where interesting people talk to each other about what they do. Happening intermittently since 2007, Cheap Talk pairs pioneering thinkers from divergent and complementary disciplines in conversation, where they present ideas both finished and in incubation. The series has explored a wide range of topics, including food production, immigration reform, grassroots economies, and the contemporary urban condition. All events are open to the public, and the elysian bar will be serving beer and wine.

For the Fall 2014/Winter 2015 series Josh Shenk, author of the recently published book, Powers of Two, Seeking the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs will curate three Cheap Talk conversations focused on collaborations with, in and around Los Angeles, a city that presents many challenges.

Event Link: http://clockshop.org/cheaptalk.html

Doors Open @ 7:00pm

Talk @ 7:30pm
$5-10 Suggested Donation

Events are held at Clockshop at 2806 Clearwater St., Los Angeles, CA 90039.